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    In LeAnne Howe at the Intersections of Southern and Native American Literature, I attempt to depict the complexity of the Choctaw writer’s work—its intellectualism, its humor, its powerful invocations of Indigenous presence as it moves within, outward from, and back through the South. Though my book is the first monograph on LeAnne Howe, she has [...]

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    As National Poetry Month winds down, we wanted to share some great news from the past four weeks. Steven Sodergren’s The Army of the Potomac in the Overland and Petersburg Campaigns won the Colby Award for Best Military Book. Yellow Fever, Race, and Ecology in Nineteenth-Century New Orleans by Urmi Engineer Willoughby won the Kemper [...]

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    Every year, The Austin Civil War Round Table awards the Daniel M. & Marilyn W. Laney Prize to the author of the book that best advances the knowledge of the Civil War’s military or political events and the Americans who took part in those events. We are thrilled to announce that noted Civil War scholar [...]

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    Books saved Walker Percy’s life. It would be more accurate to say, novels saved his life. The cure was surprising because Percy was a resident at Columbia University at the time, training to be a physician. He never would have expected his life to take a turn toward fiction. Yet, after he contracted tuberculosis, Percy [...]

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    May has been a whirlwind of great news for LSU Press! Andrew F. Lang’s In the Wake of War won the Tom Watson Brown Book Award from the Society of Civil War Historians! And Neon Visions: The Comics of Howard Chaykin by Brannon Costello won the Comic Studies Society’s Best Book Award! Walter Stern did a quick [...]

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    We are thrilled to announce that Andrew Lang’s In the Wake of War: Military Occupation, Emancipation, and Civil War America has won the 2018 Tom Watson Brown Book Award! The Society of Civil War Historians presents this $50,000 honor annually to the author of the best book published in the previous year on the causes, conduct, [...]

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    Readers may be familiar with the “Lost Cause” narrative of the Civil War, wherein white southerners methodically mythologized the Civil War as a virtuous stand against federal interference into the southern way of life. We marvel today at the persistence of Civil War memorialization in the form of monuments, street names, and university legacies. White [...]

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    The name of the American poet Wallace Stevens (1879-1955) is not as familiar as other poets of his generation like Robert Frost and E.E. Cummings. He’s best known, not just for being a poet, but also a successful business man in Hartford, CT: vice-president of the Hartford Accident and Indemnity Co. He somehow managed to [...]

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    As we settle into summer, we wanted to share some recent news and publicity from LSU Press! Freedom’s Dance is heating up with a New Orleans summer event lineup that you won’t want to miss. Signings next week include: Octavia Books – Tuesday, July 3 at 6 p.m. Live brass band to follow. Ashe Cultural [...]

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    This week marks a significant transition as the staff of LSU Press and The Southern Review said goodbye to former director MaryKatherine Callaway. Embarking upon her retirement after fifteen years as director, MaryKatherine leaves a legacy of outstanding leadership and unwavering commitment to publishing works of scholarly and creative merit. As a result of her [...]

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    The academic study of the British public’s attitude toward the American Civil War began almost a century ago with the publication of Ephraim Douglass Adams’s Great Britain and the American Civil War (1925). This subject initially attracted interest among historians because they assumed that public opinion influenced British foreign policy, and that policy, in turn, [...]

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  • 07/20/18--10:00: Making Poetry Out of History
  • A few years ago, after publishing two books of poems grounded in my personal experiences as a middle-class American woman, I found myself enmeshed in the 18th century, among seafaring British males of varied socioeconomic classes and the natives of a remote Pacific island, encountering each other for the first time. Eventually, my research into [...]

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    July marked a significant transition at the Press with the retirement of former director, MaryKatherine Callaway. As we surge into a new, exciting era of scholarly publishing at LSU, we wanted to share some recent news and publicity! Julie M. Thomas is celebrating the release of her children’s book Poncho’s Rescue with an amazing lineup […]

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    As in other efforts to integrate civic institutions in the 1950s and 1960s, the determination of local activists won the battle against segregation in libraries. In particular, the willingness of young black community members to take part in organized protests and direct actions ensured that local libraries would become truly free to all citizens. Yet, […]

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